The Common Rule: Habits of Purpose for an Age of Distraction

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  • ECPA 2020 Christian Book Award Finalist – New Author
  • Christianity Today 2020 Book of the Year Award, tied for top honor Christian Living/Discipleship
  • 2020 Outreach Magazine Resource of the Year (“Also Recommended,” Leadership)

Habits form us more than we form them. The modern world is a machine of a thousand invisible habits, forming us into anxious, busy, and depressed people. We yearn for the freedom and peace of the gospel, but remain addicted to our technology, shackled by our screens, and exhausted by our routines. But because our habits are the water we swim in, they are almost invisible to us. What can we do about it? The answer to our contemporary chaos is to practice a rule of life that aligns our habits to our beliefs. The Common Rule offers four daily and four weekly habits, designed to help us create new routines and transform frazzled days into lives of love for God and neighbor. Justin Earley provides concrete, doable practices, such as a daily hour of phoneless presence or a weekly conversation with a friend. These habits are “common” not only because they are ordinary, but also because they can be practiced in community. They have been lived out by people across all walks of life―businesspeople, professionals, parents, students, retirees―who have discovered new hope and purpose. As you embark on these life-giving practices, you will find the freedom and rest for your soul that comes from aligning belief in Jesus with the practices of Jesus.


From the Publisher

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Habits of Purpose for an Age of Distraction

“When someone asks how you’re doing and you always find yourself answering, “So busy and crazy,” it might be time for a change. The Common Rule offers practical wisdom on how to slowly but deliberately restructure our lives, and it shows us that when we embrace limitations, we paradoxically gain the freedom we long for.” – John Dyer, author of From the Garden to the City: The Redeeming and Corrupting Power of Technology

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Learn the 8 Habits of The Common Rule

Justin Whitmel Earley explains the simple daily and weekly habits that can transform your life and faith.

Discover The Common Rule for different walks of life: skeptics, parents, the workplace, artists & creatives, entrepreneurs, addicts, and those dealing with mental illness.

Earley draws from personal experience of burnout and addiction to share what transformed his habits and brought him into deeper faith.

Discovering the Freedom of Limitations

Justin Whitmel Earley,habits at a glance,daily habits,weekly habits,phone off,habit making

Justin Whitmel Earley,habits at a glance,daily habits,weekly habits,phone off,habit making

Justin Whitmel Earley,habits at a glance,daily habits,weekly habits,phone off,habit making

Justin Whitmel Earley,habits at a glance,daily habits,weekly habits,phone off,habit making

Justin Whitmel Earley,habits at a glance,daily habits,weekly habits,phone off,habit making

Justin Whitmel Earley,habits at a glance,daily habits,weekly habits,phone off,habit making

How to Practice the Common Rule

What is a rule? What are the eight habits of The Common Rule?

Develop Daily Habits

Learn to recognize & break bad habits as liturgies of wrong belief:

Habit: Wake up exhausted again, because I never get to bed on time.

Liturgy of Wrong Belief: I am not a creature; I am infinite. My body will be fine. I am a god.

Develop Weekly Habits

See how your habits and routines correspond to two different spectrums: Love of God & Love of Neighbor.

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